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Miseno II Pizzeria & Italian  ::   ::  Created on Friday, November 9, 2018
Miseno II Pizzeria & Italian
598 W High St, Carlisle, PA 17013

-Another GREAT pizza place near the Carlisle, PA Airport.

-Easy driving distance with a ride from the airport - 10 minutes and right in the heart of a college campus, Dickenson College - and this is where many of the athletic teams come for snacks or after-game celebrations, but never too crowded.

-The pizza is incredible - really good and this town has a lot of good pizza.

-The pastas and other dishes are superb as well - can't miss here!

-Good prices and service - all in all a good deal if you are not sure exactly what you want. When you walk in and smell the food, you will want something fast!

Mike Marra, Keystone Flight
  read more...
MISSION BBQ  ::   ::  Created on Friday, November 9, 2018
MISSION BBQ
5045 Jonestown Rd, Harrisburg, PA 17112

-Outstanding REAL BBQ of all types! The meat and sauces are incredible!

-Military/patriotic themed place - very interesting and inspiring to eat here!

-Take the courtesy car or cab from the airport - probably about a 15 min drive or so - well worth it!

-I had the beef brisket that was so soft you could cut it with a fork....delicious! I had trouble deciding which sauce to use, so I had a little of all of them - and all were great.

-Prices were good - I will be BACK.

Mike Marra, Keystone Flight  read more...
The Runway Bar And Grill  ::   ::  Created on Friday, November 9, 2018
The Runway Bar And Grill
115 Old York Rd, New Cumberland, PA 17070

-Right off the end of the departure end of runway 26, this is a classic PA non-chain restaurant that serves a pretty wide menu of lunch and dinner items.

-Courtesy Car available OR you can walk about a half a mile - but driving is much easier from the FBO.

-I had the seafood soup which was tremendous, followed by the CRAB CAKE sandwich, which was also superb.

-Full bar if you can drink. Prices were fair and service was very good.

-If you are looking for a good stop-over place for lunch or dinner, this is it. You can also plan a group fly-out to this place as it is big enough to accomodate a crowd of pilots.

-Recommended!

Mike Marra, Keystone Flight
  read more...
Hangar 6 Air Cafe  ::   ::  Created on Wednesday, October 10, 2018
Hangar 6 Air Cafe is located on the East side of Garner Field Airport (KUVA), next to Uvalde Flight Center 249 Airport Blvd Uvalde, TX 78801   read more...
My Brother's Pizza of Gettysburg, PA  ::   ::  Created on Tuesday, September 25, 2018
MY BROTHER'S PIZZA
1685 Fairfield Rd # A, Gettysburg, PA 17325
(717) 339-0599

Land at the magnificent turf field of Marsh Creek, 8PN9 and walk 1.3 miles to the east to find terrific pizza, subs, pasta and traditional Italian dishes that are out of this world good!

We went in with a 3-ship formation and were treated like royalty - excellent food, service and prices!

This is a great place to eat while flying into the Gettysburg area and touring the many monuments, museums and the historic battlefield.

Worth a journey to take it all in!

Mike Marra, Keystone Flight
  read more...
Parlin Field  ::   ::  Created on Monday, September 17, 2018
Two onsite campsites at the woodbine across from the center taxiway. Loaner bikes available to explore the area, and fishing in the river running along the edge of the airfield, near the campsites (be sure to get a license from the state for fishing).  read more...
Vickey's Diner of York, PA  ::   ::  Created on Sunday, August 5, 2018
Vickey's Diner
Near YORK, PA Airport (KTHV)
4320 W Market St, York, PA 17408

Land at York and take the courtesy car EAST to Vickey's Diner - under new management, and WOW, the food, service and prices are terrific!

This is an OLD TIME diner that is fun to visit - something you see all over the North East. Nice seating and everything was CLEAN. Wait staff was excellent and funny.

Portions were typical of PA -- enormous! Could barely finish one pancake!

Nice fly-away breakfast location!

Mike Marra, Keystone Flight  read more...
KHTO Just Plane Fun Day  ::   ::  Created on Saturday, August 4, 2018
Vintage and exotic aircraft and cars, warbird flyby, food, family activities.  read more...
The Rusty Nail at the Beach Shack, Cape May, NJ  ::   ::  Created on Friday, July 27, 2018
The Rusty Nail is a GREAT place to eat right on the beach in Cape May, NJ!

Visited here by flying in with my daughter and ordering the CRAB CAKE sandwich! Awesome!

Fly into KWWD Airport and take an UBER or cab to the shore - once there the entire town and beach is within easy walking distance.

Great views, service and food - this is a place to start seeing Cape May!

Mike Marra, Keystone Flight

Background:

Welcome to the Rusty Nail
“The Nail,” as it’s known by the locals, is the famed iconic surfer bar and restaurant that made a name for itself in the ‘70s. It's right here at the Beach Shack, just steps away from your room. Back in the day lifeguards, surfers and beautiful beach bunnies gathered around the wood bar that was rumored to be the longest in all of Cape May. Now it’s your turn to join in the fun for breakfast, lunch or dinner. Now that the Beach Shack is open from May-December, so is The Nail, with the same great live entertainment and classic seaside menu. In the summer gather around the fire pit for a cold drink. When the weather starts to cool down, come on in and sit by the new indoor fireplace. Kids’ meals are served on a souvenir Beach Shack Frisbee, giving you a fun after-dinner activity. Indoor spaces spill into outdoor seating, sand bar, fire pit and shuffleboard. Young, old and even four-legged friends are invited in from the beach for live entertainment and Rusty Nail’s beach blanket comfort food that can also be wrapped to go. The Rusty Nail was named one of Zagat's 10 Hottest Restaurants on the Jersey Shore, 2014.
Hours:
Open Daily
Breakfast: 7:30 AM to 12:00 PM
Lunch: 11:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Dinner: 5:00 PM to 10:00 PM
Bar: Open until midnight  read more...
8th Annual LL22 Brookeridge Fly/Drive-In Sat. Sept 8th  ::   ::  Created on Thursday, July 19, 2018
8th Annual LL22 Brookeridge Fly/Drive-In, Saturday Sept. 8, 2018 10 AM – 3 PM Rusty Pilots Seminar presented by AOPA. Free Admission, large display of airplanes, food, music and open houses. Fly-in and receive two free lunches. GPS address: 760 86th Street, Downers Grove, IL. Information at www.LL22.org and link to register for Rusty Pilots Seminar   read more...
Jeff Kuss, USMC Blue Angel Pilot Memorial  ::   ::  Created on Wednesday, June 27, 2018
Marine Captain Jeff Kuss, a member of the Navy Blue Angels Team, lost his life when his plane crashed June 2, 2016 during a practice session for the Great Tennessee Airshow in Smyrna, Tennessee.  The memorial is adjacent to the Smyrna/Rutherford County Airport, Smyrna, TN(KMQY).
  read more...
Grotto Pizza of Rehoboth Beach, Delaware  ::   ::  Created on Sunday, June 17, 2018
Grotto Pizza of Rehoboth Beach, Delaware....is everywhere in this area!

Fly in to friendly KGED (paved) or DE25 (turf) and get a rental for the day, weekend, or week here in Rehoboth - it is a superb place for beaches, fishing, hiking, biking, and trying seafood! However, we HAVE to try the pizza everywhere and this was really good!

Highly recommended - take a long walk on the boardwalk and then treat yourself to Grotto Pizza!

Mike Marra, Keystone Flight



Background of Grotto Pizza:

Grotto Pizza Founded in 1960.

Dominick Pulieri was born in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania to Italian-immigrant parents. After high school, Dominick enrolled in Kings College in Wilkes-Barre and graduated as a pre-med major with a Bachelors Degree in Biology in 1964. In addition to founding Grotto Pizza, Dominick taught biology, general science and chemistry in the Smyrna Special School District from 1965 to 1970.
From an early age, Dominick was making pizzas in his brother-in-law, Joseph Paglianite’s pizza restaurant in Harvey’s Lake, Pennsylvania. It was at Joe’s Pizza that Dominick’s passion for pizza was ignited.

In 1960, Dominick, along with his brother-in-law, Joe and sister, Mary Jean Paglianite, ventured to Delaware to open a pizza restaurant. This was the birth of Grotto Pizza. During this first summer, pizza slices sold for 20 cents each and a whole pizza was $1.60. The challenge, however, was to introduce pizza in an area where it was not recognized.

To create a market for his pizza, Dominick and his sister spent long hours talking to people and handing free samples to the people who passed by his restaurant. In July of that summer, he noticed he was starting to get many repeat guests and it was the local Sussex County guests, and later the tourists, who put Grotto Pizza on the map.

In the years that followed, Grotto Pizza has continued to grow and prosper. In 1963, Grotto Pizza opened a second location on the boardwalk in Rehoboth Beach. In 1967, the original Rehoboth Avenue take-out stand moved to its present location in the “Arcade Building.”

Still a pizza-only enterprise, Grotto Pizza continued as a seasonal business from May through October. Customers would take pizzas home at the end of each summer and freeze them in order to have the taste of Grotto Pizza through the winter. In 1974, Dominick opened Grotto Pizza as a year-round restaurant to meet the demands of his loyal guests.

From these humble beginnings, Grotto Pizza has grown throughout Delaware, Pennsylvania and Maryland.

Although Grotto Pizza has expanded beyond the small take-out stand, the company continues to adhere to its core values of excellent food, friendly guest service and community service.

Grotto Pizza thanks its loyal guests for making it a legend in Delaware and beyond for over half a century!  read more...
Crabby Dick's Seafood House  ::   ::  Created on Sunday, June 17, 2018
Crabby Dick's Seafood Restaurant of Rehoboth Beach, Delaware

18831 Coastal Hwy, Rehoboth Beach, DE 19971

(302) 645-9132

Fly into friendly KGED (paved) or DE25 (turf) and secure a ride to the Rehoboth area for fantastic seafood, beaches, hiking, biking and a lot of great family fun!

Crabby Dick's is a magnificent seafood place and a lot of fun for mature (PG-13) audiences. Some of the things they have on the menu are suggestive and somewhat corny and fun.

The food and service is outstanding - some of the best crab cakes around!

Worth the journey!

Mike Marra, Keystone Flight

  read more...
2018 Fathers Day Fly In  ::   ::  Created on Sunday, May 27, 2018
Camping onfield. Food Tents all day.  read more...
American Automobile Club of America Museum  ::   ::  Created on Sunday, May 20, 2018
Land at friendly 58N, Reigle Field (family owned - low priced fuel) and catch a quick ride up to the AACA Museum - you will be absolutely impressed with this world-class auto museum - it is nothing short of spectacular! I visited yesterday, 19 May 2018 with my family and it was terrific! If you enjoy cars or restoration, this is the place to see. The quality of the refurbishment of the old cars, with many fantastic displays of American Auto Culture, are here to see - amazing!

Open Daily
9:00am - 5:00pm

AACA Museum, Inc.
161 Museum Drive
Hershey, PA 17033
Phone: 717.566.7100
Fax: 717.566.7300

Mike Marra, Keystone Flight

Background and History....


The AACA Museum is dedicated to the preservation and presentation of motor vehicle history in a manner that provides for the education and entertainment of our guests.
Our goal is to deliver a world class automotive experience through innovative and interactive exhibits that appeal to all ages and illustrate the historical evolution and potential future impacts of one of the most culturally defining innovations of modern times.

The Antique Automobile Club of America (AACA) originated the concept of a collector-oriented automotive museum as a complement to its Research Center and Library. A decision to move forward on implementing the project led to the incorporation of the AACA Museum in 1993. Like the Library, the AACA Museum was established as a nonprofit educational institution under section 501(c)(3) of the Revised IRS code. This status made donations to these entities tax deductible. The Museum’s offices and small storage and display area were housed at the Club’s headquarters on Governor Road in Hershey, PA.

In 1993, following feasibility and planning studies, the Museum launched a $12 million Capital Campaign to build a dedicated museum facility. By the time of the ground-breaking for the 71,000 square foot building in October, 2001, seven million dollars had been received or pledged. The initial concept of a collector’s museum had also expanded to encompass a broader interpretive charge that focused on presenting America’s automotive heritage to a general audience. The new Museum opened to the public on June 26, 2003.

Today’s AACA Museum is professionally staffed, collecting institution presenting semi-permanent and temporary exhibitions. Exhibitions are supported by educational programs for school and community audiences. It sponsors workshops and other activities designed to raise public awareness and appreciation of the role that the automobile has played in shaping 20th century America. The AACA museum celebrates the role of the collector in preserving and making accessible a material record of this phenomenon. It is also unique in that virtually all the cars on display have been opened or donated by AACA members.

In addition, the AACA Museum houses the Museum of Bus Transportation Collection. A floor full of buses and more than 30 motorcycles, motorbikes and Cushman complement the 100 cars on display. The museum have over 20,000 sq. ft. in additional storage so vehicles can be rotated on a regular basis. Several times a year the displays change with loaned vehicles that fit special displays that range from horseless carriages to the muscle car era. The AACA Museum has been recognized by the Smithsonian as an Affiliate Museum which is an extremely rare honor. The AACA Museum has also been recognized as one of the Top 16 Automotive Museums in the world which is a great honor for this fledgling organization.  read more...
Arena's Deli and Bar at the KGED Airport  ::   ::  Created on Sunday, May 13, 2018
Arena's Deli and Bar at the KGED Airport

This is one of the nicest places with local seafood you will find at any airport on the Eastern Shore!

Right on the ramp - perfect for a fly-in lunch or dinner, and sometimes breakfast buffet!

I had the crab cakes - delicious!

Hours
Sunday: 9am – 9pm
Monday-Thursday: 11am – 9pm
Friday-Saturday: 11am – MIDNIGHT
Phone
302.856.3297
Address
21553 Rudder Lane
Georgetown, DE

Mike Marra, Keystone Flight  read more...
Tangier Island Airport (KTGI)  ::   ::  Created on Saturday, May 12, 2018
KTGI - Tangier Island - an experience just to land here!

This is a TRUE ISLAND getaway destination for small planes!

Land at KTGI and take a stroll back in time! This is a historic and scenic island, and has terrific seafood! Plan on a full day or weekend to really experience the culture and sites of this 400 year old community!

See other posts on this location for places to see and things to do...

Mike Marra, Keystone Flight


Tangier Island History
In the summer of 1608 John Smith started out on an exploration trip of the
Chesapeake Bay. He traveled from Cape Charles and went up the bay to the
Potomac River and went up as far as present day Washington D. C. and back
down to Jamestown. It was actually two trips for at one point he was very badly
hurt by a stingray and had to return to Jamestown to be treated. It was during
these two voyages, while looking for fresh water that he came across a group of
islands in the middle of the bay. He named them the "Russell Isles," for a Doctor
Russell who was then on board ship with him.
This group is today what is known as Smiths, Tangier and Watts Islands.
Tangier Island is about 6 miles below the Maryland-Virginia State line and at one
point all the islands below the state line were known as the "Tangier Islands" in
Virginia’s records. These, among others, included Shanks, Old Walnut Island,
Piney Island, Queen’s Ridge, Horse Hummock, South Point, and Hog Neck. The
latter three being attached to the lower part of Smith’s Island in Maryland. The
"s" was probably lost sometime after 1880 when erosion took its toll on these
islands and the inhabitants moved to Crisfield MD, Onancock Va or Tangier
Island itself. At that time what we now know as Tangier Island consisted of six
ridges or long narrow areas of land rising slightly above the marsh of which
three are inhabited today. Main Ridge is today the center of town. The old
church was in the same location as the present one on the northern end of this
ridge and the land south of it was called "The Field." At one time it was planted
with corn. Canton is the ridge just to the east of Main Ridge and is connected by
a bridge. It was on this ridge the first settlement was made and for a while was
more populated that Main Ridge. It is generally believed that the homes of the
early fishermen were here while the other ridges were used for farming. West
Ridge is about a mile long. In recent times a sea wall was erected and it has a
small airport or airpark on it.
Oyster Creek Ridge or what remains of this has long been abandoned. Joshua
Thomas’ son, John ran the first store on the island here. Canaan or "The
Up’ards" is about a mile and a half above the others and although at one time it
was connected to Main Ridge by a roadway it became unreachable by land
around 1923 and has not been inhabited since 1928. East Point Ridge was a
very small ridge to the northeast of Canton. It was abandoned in approximately
1905, shortly after the houses on it burned.
In 1670 Ambrose White received a patent for 400 acres called an Island in the
Chesapeake Bay. the next year White assigned his patent to Charles and John
West. In 1673 William Walton was granted 400 acres on the western island which
was formerly patented by White. There is a similar entry in the patent book three
years later but Scarburgh and West were the recipients instead of Walton and in
1678 a formal patent was issued to both of them. Charles Scarburgh left his
interest to his wife Elizabeth in 1702 and John West’s interest went to his eldest
son a year later. In 1713 two patents were granted to Elizabeth Scarburgh and
Anthony West for Tangier Islands. One was for 900 acres which included the
original 400 acres and 500 acres more found within its bounds. The other grant
was for 170 acres of new land south of Tangier called "Sandy Beach Island"
which was probably the hook shaped part that is now attached to the main of
the island. This was the first time Tangier Islands was named in the records.
Although Elizabeth Scarburgh left her interest to her daughters, some how the
title went to her oldest son, Bennett. It then passed to Henry Scarburgh and then
to a Charles Scarburgh. In 1762 Charles Scarburgh confirmed an undeeded sale
of his half to Colonel Thomas Hall. The next year Hall sold this to William
Andrews as 475 acres.
Tradition states that Tangier was first settled by a John Crockett and his eight
sons in 1686, who had come to the island to tend cattle, but nothing has been
found to verify this. The first Crockett of record on Tangier was Joseph, the son
of Sampson and the grandson of John Tyler of Smith’s Island MD. It was this
Joseph who bought 475 acres of the Andrews land in 1778. It does not seem
likely that Joseph tended cattle at all for he was left a inheritance by his
grandfather John Tyler, was bound to his uncle Thomas Tyler to be a weaver
and learn his numbers, lived on Smith’s Island MD with his uncle until about
1744, was made constable of "Tangier Islands" in 1763 and was given all of
"South Point" by John Fish in his will of 4 April 1765. It was not likely that a man
of some means would be tending cattle. By 1799 the West part of the patent had
descended down to a John West who in this year left his interest to his son
Anthony, who was to complete an unrecorded deed for 100 acres to Joseph’s
son John and the remainder was to be sold. Joshua Thomas, who was raised
on Smith’s Island, living with his cousin David Tyler there and had married
Rachel Evans, the daughter of Richard, bought 75 acres of it.
The 1800 census of Accomack County showed that there were 79 people on the
"Tangier Islands," most of which were Crocketts or descendants of Crocketts.
Farming was their chief occupation. By 1880 the population was 589 and by
1900 there were 1064 inhabitants. The population increased slowly between
1800 and 1850, and then rapidly until 1900.
In 1805 an event happened that had a great impact on the life on Tangier, the
Chesapeake Bay and Joshua Thomas in general. The number of Methodist
followers had been growing since the close of the Revolutionary War and
Joshua Thomas was hired to carry some people to a Methodist camp meeting
on Pungoteague Creek. While there, he heard Lorenzo Dow, a very powerful
preacher speak and he along with others were converted. On arriving home he
arranged for a meeting to be called. And, so, the Methodist Church was
established on Tangier. The small Methodist society, led by Thomas until he
moved to Deal’s Island MD met in homes until 1835 when the first church was
built. A list of members in 1825 includes: Henry Crockett and Sally Crockett,
Priscilla Crockett, a widow, Zachariah and Polly Crockett, Daniel and Esther
Dise, Rhoda Parks, Babel and Nancy Paul, George and Leah Pruitt, John and
Elizabeth Thomas, and John and Anna Thomas. The church grew and
prospered and in 1856 the first Sunday school was established by Henry
Crockett and Kathryn Sturgis; children and adults attended.
The War of 1812 did not have much effect on Tangier Island until 1813 when the
British extended their excursions up the Chesapeake Bay. By March of that year
the British had traveled up the Bay for about 180 miles. shortly after, they arrived
on Tangier Island. They had set up a number of water wells on the beach and
built several houses. They threw up breastworks and mounted a cannon on the
south end of the island adjacent to Joshua Thomas’ camp meeting grove and
also had plans to erect a hospital when summer came. At one point, about 1200
British soldiers must have been on the island. In Summer of 1813, the British
disembarked for their attack on Baltimore from Tangier Island. The commanding
officer asked Joshua Thomas to speak before they left and his sermon warned
of defeat.
There have been four epidemics on Tangier. First, in 1866, came Asian cholera.
Along with this epidemic came a religious revival with repenting and praying
when the people started to die. Bodies were quickly buried, many of them in
their front yard and without stones, for there was as many as five adults dying at
a time. Both the Death Records of Accomack County and the dates on the
graves with stones show that the island was hardest hit in the month of October.
In the early 1870’s there was both tuberculosis and a measles epidemic and in
the 1880’s there was smallpox.
Besides sickness, the weather can be and was harsh at times. There have been
many tropical storms and hurricanes to hit the island. One such storm in 1821
"The September Gust" swept over the island leaving great destruction. The
winters can also be especially hard. Almost once a year the Bay freezes making
travel to the mainland impossible for a few days and at least once a century the
freeze is so great that people walked on the ice to get supplies. Today supplies
are flown in.
With the advent of the seafood market in the 1840’s the Chesapeake Bay
became alive with sailing ships that carried oysters and later crabs to major
cities such as Baltimore and New York. The people gradually stopped
harvesting the land and harvested the waters. With the coming of the railroad to
Crisfield MD, their water crop could be shipped farther and oystering and
crabbing became their main livelihood. Tangier Island today is a mixture of old
and new. The people still follow the water, and along with Smith’s Island MD,
other bayside communities, supply a great amount of the nation’s seafood. The
majority of the people still follow the Methodist Religion that Joshua Thomas
brought to the Island in 1805. And, today, like in 1800 the population is mainly
Crocketts and descendants of Crocketts.   read more...
Hilda Crockett's Cheasapeake House Restaurant and B+B  ::   ::  Created on Saturday, May 12, 2018
LAND at KTGI and walk to the Chesapeake House!

Just visited on 9 May 2018 and it was fantastic for crab cakes!
Everything on the beautiful island is within walking distance - this one is great for groups or overnight stays...highly recommended!

We have landed with a 12 ship formation of 40 folks and been able to eat here as a group!

Call ahead if possible!

Hilda Crockett's Chesapeake House
Restaurant and Bed & Breakfast
PO Box 232 - 16243 Main Street
Tangier Island, Virginia 23440
757 891 2331

Mike Marra, Keystone Flight


Tangier Island History
In the summer of 1608 John Smith started out on an exploration trip of the Chesapeake Bay. He traveled from Cape Charles and went up the bay to the Potomac River and went up as far as present day Washington D. C. and back down to Jamestown. It was actually two trips for at one point he was very badly hurt by a stingray and had to return to Jamestown to be treated. It was during these two voyages, while looking for fresh water that he came across a group of islands in the middle of the bay. He named them the "Russell Isles," for a Doctor Russell who was then on board ship with him.
This group is today what is known as Smiths, Tangier and Watts Islands. Tangier Island is about 6 miles below the Maryland-Virginia State line and at one point all the islands below the state line were known as the "Tangier Islands" in Virginia’s records. These, among others, included Shanks, Old Walnut Island, Piney Island, Queen’s Ridge, Horse Hummock, South Point, and Hog Neck. The latter three being attached to the lower part of Smith’s Island in Maryland. The "s" was probably lost sometime after 1880 when erosion took its toll on these islands and the inhabitants moved to Crisfield MD, Onancock Va or Tangier Island itself. At that time what we now know as Tangier Island consisted of six ridges or long narrow areas of land rising slightly above the marsh of which three are inhabited today. Main Ridge is today the center of town. The old church was in the same location as the present one on the northern end of this ridge and the land south of it was called "The Field." At one time it was planted with corn. Canton is the ridge just to the east of Main Ridge and is connected by a bridge. It was on this ridge the first settlement was made and for a while was more populated that Main Ridge. It is generally believed that the homes of the early fishermen were here while the other ridges were used for farming. West Ridge is about a mile long. In recent times a sea wall was erected and it has a small airport or airpark on it. Oyster Creek Ridge or what remains of this has long been abandoned. Joshua Thomas’ son, John ran the first store on the island here. Canaan or "The Up’ards" is about a mile and a half above the others and although at one time it was connected to Main Ridge by a roadway it became unreachable by land around 1923 and has not been inhabited since 1928. East Point Ridge was a very small ridge to the northeast of Canton. It was abandoned in approximately 1905, shortly after the houses on it burned. In 1670 Ambrose White received a patent for 400 acres called an Island in the Chesapeake Bay. the next year White assigned his patent to Charles and John West. In 1673 William Walton was granted 400 acres on the western island which was formerly patented by White. There is a similar entry in the patent book three years later but Scarburgh and West were the recipients instead of Walton and in 1678 a formal patent was issued to both of them. Charles Scarburgh left his interest to his wife Elizabeth in 1702 and John West’s interest went to his eldest son a year later. In 1713 two patents were granted to Elizabeth Scarburgh and Anthony West for Tangier Islands. One was for 900 acres which included the original 400 acres and 500 acres more found within its bounds. The other grant was for 170 acres of new land south of Tangier called "Sandy Beach Island" which was probably the hook shaped part that is now attached to the main of the island. This was the first time Tangier Islands was named in the records. AlthoughEElizabeth Scarburgh left her interest to her daughters, some how the title went to her oldest son, Bennett. It then passed to Henry Scarburgh and then to a Charles jScarburgh. In 1762 Charles Scarburgh confirmed an undeeded sale of his half to Colonel Thomas Hall. The next year Hall sold this to William Andrews as 475 acres. Tradition states that Tangier was first settled by a John Crockett and his eight sons in 1686, who had come to the island to tend cattle, but nothing has been found to verify this. The first Crockett of record on Tangier was Joseph, the son of Sampson and the grandson of John Tyler of Smith’s Island MD. It was this Joseph who bought 475 acres of the Andrews land in 1778. It does not seem likely that Joseph tended cattle at all for he was left a inheritance by his grandfather John Tyler, was bound to his uncle Thomas Tyler to be a weaver and learn his numbers, lived on Smith’s Island MD with his uncle until about 1744, was made constable of "Tangier Islands" in 1763 and was given all of "South Point" by John Fish in his will of 4 April 1765. It was not likely that a man of some means would be tending cattle. By 1799 the West part of the patent had descended down to a John West who in this year left his interest to his son Anthony, who was to complete an unrecorded deed for 100 acres to Joseph’s son John and the remainder was to be sold. Joshua Thomas, who was raised on Smith’s Island, living with his cousin David Tyler there and had married Rachel Evans, the daughter of Richard, bought 75 acres of it. The 1800 census of Accomack County showed that there were 79 people on the "Tangier Islands," most of which were Crocketts or descendants of Crocketts. Farming was their chief occupation. By 1880 the population was 589 and by 1900 there were 1064 inhabitants. The population increased slowly between 1800 and 1850, and then rapidly until 1900.
In 1805 an event happened that had a great impact on the life on Tangier, the Chesapeake Bay and Joshua Thomas in general. The number of Methodist followers had been growing since the close of the Revolutionary War and Joshua Thomas was hired to carry some people to a Methodist camp meeting on Pungoteague Creek. While there, he heard Lorenzo Dow, a very powerful preacher speak and he along with others were converted. On arriving home he arranged for a meeting to be called. And, so, the Methodist Church was established on Tangier. The small Methodist society, led by Thomas until he moved to Deal’s Island MD met in homes until 1835 when the first church was built. A list of members in 1825 includes: Henry Crockett and Sally Crockett, Priscilla Crockett, a widow, Zachariah and Polly Crockett, Daniel and Esther Dise, Rhoda Parks, Babel and Nancy Paul, George and Leah Pruitt, John and Elizabeth Thomas, and John and Anna Thomas. The church grew and prospered and in 1856 the first Sunday school was established by Henry Crockett and Kathryn Sturgis; children and adults attended. The War of 1812 did not have much effect on Tangier Island until 1813 when the British extended their excursions up the Chesapeake Bay. By March of that year the British had traveled up the Bay for about 180 miles. shortly after, they arrived on Tangier Island. They had set up a number of water wells on the beach and built several houses. They threw up breastworks and mounted a cannon on the south end of the island adjacent to Joshua Thomas’ camp meeting grove and also had plans to erect a hospital when summer came. At one point, about 1200 British soldiers must have been on the island. In Summer of 1813, the British disembarked for their attack on Baltimore from Tangier Island. The commanding officer asked Joshua Thomas to speak before they left and his sermon warned of defeat. There have been four epidemics on Tangier. First, in 1866, came Asian cholera. Along with this epidemic came a religious revival with repenting and praying when the people started to die. Bodies were quickly buried, many of them in their front yard and without stones, for there was as many as five adults dying at a time. Both the Death Records of Accomack County and the dates on the graves with stones show that the island was hardest hit in the month of October.
In the early 1870’s there was both tuberculosis and a measles epidemic and in the 1880’s there was smallpox. Besides sickness, the weather can be and was harsh at times. There have been many tropical storms and hurricanes to hit the island. One such storm in 1821 "The September Gust" swept over the island leaving great destruction. The winters can also be especially hard. Almost once a year the Bay freezes making travel to the mainland impossible for a few days and at least once a century the freeze is so great that people walked on the ice to get supplies. Today supplies are flown in. With the advent of the seafood market in the 1840’s the Chesapeake Bay became alive with sailing ships that carried oysters and later crabs to major cities such as Baltimore and New York. The people gradually stopped harvesting the land and harvested the waters. With the coming of the railroad to Crisfield MD, their water crop could be shipped farther and oystering and crabbing became their main livelihood. Tangier Island today is a mixture of old and new. The people still follow the water, and along with Smith’s Island MD and other bayside communities, supply a great amount of the nation’s seafood. The majority of the people still follow the Methodist Religion that Joshua Thomas brought to the Island in 1805. And, today, like in 1800 the population is mainly Crocketts and descendants of Crocketts.  read more...
2018 Mount Washington Regional Airport Fly-In, June 23-24  ::   ::  Created on Friday, May 11, 2018
Mount Washington Regional Airport (KHIE) is having its 3rd Annual Fly-In on Saturday and Sunday June 23 and 24, 2018. Come to the airport in the heart of the White Mountains that has been called the jewel of New Hampshire's North Country. Meet old pilot friends and make new ones from all across the Northeast. We have lots of ways for visiting pilots to win exciting and valuable prizes including our first Airport Poker Run, a flour bombing competition and more. There will be Biplane Rides, Helicopter Rides, UTV Fun Rides, static aircraft displays, RC Airplanes, an Antique Tractor Show, and a Classic Car Cruise-in. This is going to be an amazing event with fun for everyone in the family. Visit our Craft Fair and watch demonstrations by local craftspeople or go on a guided Nature Tour of nearby Pondicherry Wildlife Refuge. The kids will love playing in the bouncy-castle or taking a ride on a Model Train. Hungry? Don't miss the Lobster Dinner on Saturday night and the FREE Pancake Breakfast on Sunday Morning. Food vendors will be on site throughout both days. For complete details and to reserve your Lobster visit the airport website at http://www.mountwashingtonairport.com/events/. Follow the event on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/mtwra. Haul out the plane and get up here! Admission is FREE and Avgas will be $0.75 off the regular price. Canned food donation requested for our local food pantry.   read more...
28th Land of Enchantment Fly-In (LOEFI)  ::   ::  Created on Tuesday, April 17, 2018
FLY IN, DRIVE IN! Bring the family! To the 28th annual Land of Enchantment Fly-In at Double Eagle II Airport (KAEG), Aug 25, 2018. Includes: STATIC DISPLAYS (distinctive aircraft, automobiles, military vehicles). WINGS SEMINARS. AWARDS for 'best of category' aircraft (owner-built, LSAs, vintage, contemporary, warbirds, sailplanes, and trikes), oldest aircraft, and fly-in from furthest away. EXHIBITS by New Mexico aviation organizations and vendors. FLY MART. Hands-on activities for kids. PANCAKE BREAKFAST and BURGER LUNCH. For more information visit www.eaa179.org/. Hosted by EAA Chapter 179.  read more...
Barbara Jean's, 214 Mallory Ave. St. Simmons Isl, BA  ::   ::  Created on Wednesday, April 4, 2018
Barbara Jean's is down in the Pier area of St. Simmons, not too far from the airport. We stopped just because we were hungry, but will make a point to come back. This is seriously good food, about anything you can think of, they have. Order modestly because portions are huge. Barbara Jean's husband, Jim, is a retired Marine fighter pilot, but he is still on duty at the restaurant greeting and seating folks, at least when Barbara Jean herself doesn't beat him to it! Believe me this is a real treat, and a destination in itself.  read more...
Katara's Crosswinds Cafe  ::   ::  Created on Friday, March 9, 2018
Upstairs in the new Terminal Building near taxiway E2. FANTASTIC food. Great views of the runway and the C-5s doing landings. Awesome BBQ. Definitely above average airport fare. Highly recommended. Also, the terminal has a nice mini-museum displaying the history of the airport. Give yourself an extra 1/2hr for that. ;-)  read more...
Empire State Aerosciences Museum  ::   ::  Created on Friday, February 23, 2018
The Empire State Aerosciences Museum is a one-of-a-kind cultural resource located at Schenectady County Airport in the Town of Glenville, NY, at the site of the former General Electric Flight Test Center. Dedicated to interpreting aviation, particularly as related to New York State, the Museum offers visitors a variety of enjoyable and educational experiences, including interpretive exhibits, a spectacular collection of restored aircraft, the state's largest aviation library, as well as education programs.  read more...
Mom & Dad  ::   ::  Created on Saturday, January 27, 2018
This would be a trip to see Mom & Dad.  read more...
Trigger Gap  ::   ::  Created on Tuesday, December 12, 2017
Trigger Gap is the latest project of the RAF, which incidentally is a great group to support. Trigger Gap is a newly constructed grass strip on top of Pension Mountain about 3 miles southeast of Berryville Arkansas. This is a very nice strip in great condition, long,smooth, with very little obstructions.Great spot to camp for a couple or more days. Berryville 4M1 is a nice friendly place for fuel and courtesy car to pick up supplies or a quick trip to Eureka Springs an old touristy town. You can make a nice few days in this area, lots to do in a beautiful part of the mid west.  read more...
Forestiere Underground Gardens  ::   ::  Created on Monday, December 11, 2017
In the early 1900s, Sicilian immigrant, citrus grower and visionary Baldassare Forestiere began turning what was useless farmland into a vast network of rooms, tunnels and courtyards as a subterranean escape from the sweltering Central Valley summer heat. Using only shovels, picks and other hand tools, Baldassare was inspired to excavate for forty years, going as deep as 25 feet underground and spanning over 10 acres. He grew fruit trees and grapevines underground - many of which are still thriving today! Today, guests from around the world tour through his grottoes, passageways and underground homes. Although he never officially opened the Mediterranean resort of his dreams, we think Baldassare would be thrilled by all of the guests marveling at his life's work today and finding inspiration underground.   read more...
2018 Annual New Year's Fly-Out to Smoketown  ::   ::  Created on Saturday, December 9, 2017
1 Jan 2018: The Annual New Year's Day Fly-Out to Smoketown, PA (9th Year) -For a pilot, there is no better way to start the New Year than by FLYING and breaking open the logbook on New Year's Day! -Come join us for our annual NEW YEAR's Day Flight to Smoketown, PA, S37, a fantastic, friendly and fun little airport in Amish Country of Central PA! Cheap fuel available. -Land and then a short walk over to Joni's Place! -Land S37 between 1:30 and 1:50. Meet at the FBO for a group photo, and then all walk together over to Joni's Place (5 min walk, nearly connected to the airport) -Late Lunch with your pilot buddies, old and new, at 2:00pm! Cash helps Joni, but all forms of payment taken. http://www.jonisplace.net/ The lunch will take about an hour. -There will be a very short dedication to two beloved aviators who "Flew West" in 2017 due to old age, Jerry Rosie and John Shreve, both of who contributed to this site with posts and sponsoring fly-ins at airport 62PA, Shreveport North. -MUST be day VMC to go, pilot's call. Winds must be reasonable for light aircraft. No RSVP - just show and go! Looking for 5000 foot ceiling, 7 miles vis and winds less than 10 knots. -Last year we had 50+ pilots meet, so this is a growing event. The variety of aircraft was something to behold. What a great winter fly - out! -Weather back up date is 1 Jan 2019! -Please joint us. Mike Marra, Keystone Flight of Central PA  read more...
Jet Away Cafe  ::   ::  Created on Monday, November 20, 2017
Jet Away Cafe is on the upper floor on the Millionaire FBO, open week days. The view is great and the food is good. Best of all, FBO customers get a coupon so one in the party eats for $1, Daily specials and a selection of sandwich baskets. Great destination.  read more...
Denny's Beer Barrel Pub - USA's Largest Hamburgers!  ::   ::  Created on Sunday, November 19, 2017
Denny's Beer Barrel Pub
Land at Clearfield-Lawrence Airport, PA

Short 3.4 mile drive, cab or walk to this amazing pub!

Largest burgers around!

Mike Marra, Keystone Flight


There are countless diners, beaneries, and fast-food franchises in this country where a meal will add an inch or two to your waistline. But the idea of a restaurant whose everyday menu is designed to overwhelm you -- where a meal can be just TOO MUCH -- seems impossible in our double-stuffed land of casual fit superabundance. To operate continuously at a gastro-bypass level takes, for lack of a better word, guts.

Denny's Beer Barrel Pub, "Home of the World's Largest Burgers," is that kind of place.
No giant burger billboards announce its presence, which is far from everything in rural Pennsylvania. Even on the inside, it seems like a typical, dimly lit suds and burger joint with lots of neon beer signs and TV screens filled with sports. But hung on one wall are glass-fronted bulletin boards, packed with Polaroids of mostly young men, each with a giant hamburger before them. On the border of each photo is written the word "FINISHED" or "NO." Most of them have the word "NO."

"I think it's the enormity; it breaks your spirit," says Denny Liegey of his often-unconquered meat creations. For years Denny served one-half and one-pound hamburgers at the Pub, and then, around 1990 as he recalls, he began creating bigger burgers and selling them as a dare: "If you can eat it, we'll pay for it." The meat increased in weight to two pounds, then three. Then in 1998 Denny introduced "Ye Olde 96er," which is nine pounds altogether, six of it beef. Guinness calls it the "largest hamburger commercially available," and their certificate hangs prominently in the dining room. Competitive eaters have another name for it: "the Holy Grail of the burger world."

"As far as consumption goes, that's pretty close to what a human being can do without harming themselves," Denny says of Ye Olde 96er. Only one person has ever eaten it within the Pub's three-hour time limit, and that was "a little, skinny college girl from Princeton," according to Denny, who just showed up one night, evidently with an appetite. "It stunned the competitive eating world," Denny recalled. "They said, 'You ate the Holy Grail!' And I later heard that her mom was mad at her."

Denny gives us a tour of the kitchen to show how his burger behemoths are made. Special pans had to be developed to preserve the meat's circular shape, and Denny has a contract with a local bakery for his custom-sized buns. The burgers are baked, mostly, at low heat, so that consuming one is like eating a meat loaf. Denny's biggest burger ever -- a 123-pounder that blew away the old world record of 78.5 pounds -- took nine hours to cook. "You can't put a burger on a grill for that many hours; it would be charred," says waitress Stephanie, who obviously has first-hand knowledge of the process.

Not content to rest on his laurels, Denny now promotes the "Belly Buster," a two-person, 15-pound burger made of 11 pounds of meat plus the fixins. We ordered one for ourselves (the big burgers need several hours advance notice), but when Stephanie brought out the foot-high creation, embellished with pickles, lettuce, tomatoes, and onions, and oozing mayo and cheese, we knew that we were way out of our league. "No one has ever been able to eat it," Denny said*. He remembered that a Japanese sumo wrestler had arrived one night -- Denny's is a world bulk-eating pilgrimage site -- and ate half a Belly Buster in only an hour. "Then he just stopped," Denny recalled. "He looked at it for a while, but he never took another bite."

We drove around with ours, uneaten in the back seat, for a day. The Big Mac Museum wouldn't let us carry it inside, so we took it to an after-dark rendezvous with a similarly shaped flying saucer in a town named Mars. The next day, the giant bun made good eats for the crazed carp at the Linesville Spillway.

Despite his success at pushing the digestive envelope of others, Denny is himself a confessed failure at eating his own creations -- even the comparatively puny two-pound "Pub Challenger" is too much for him. He's happy to stay on the serving side of the dinner table, where he and his crack crew challenge all whose egos are often bigger than their stomachs. "We're real good friends with the local EMTs," Denny says, jokingly, although more than a few Beer Barrel Pub customers probably wouldn't mind going out after one last mouthful, and getting a "FINISHED" next to their snapshot.  read more...
Tallest Smokestack in the U.S.  ::   ::  Created on Sunday, November 19, 2017
Homer City, Pennsylvania: Tallest Smokestack in the U.S.

I saw this while flying into Indiana, PA Airport (Jimmy Stewart Airport). It is amazing! The steam was so powerful and so high, it created its' own little weather system!

If in the area, you simply cannot miss seeing this - it is huge! Worth a look if flying around the Pittsburgh area or going to Jimmy Stewart, which is a really nice and friendly airport with a courtesy car to go to a thriving downtown area.

Mike Marra, Keystone Flight

Background:

The stack is 1,217 feet tall. Fortunately it's so big that you can take pictures of it from far away; the power plant that it belongs to gets nervous if you get too close.

Homer City Generating Station
Address:

1750 Power Plant Rd, Homer City, PA

Directions:
At the Homer City Generating Station. Drive south of town on US 119 around 2.5 miles, then turn west onto Power Plant Rd.
Hours:
Private property visible from road.

The Homer City Power Plant boasts the largest smoke stack in the United States. Even though it is only the 3rd largest in the world at 1,217 ft., it is very impressive. You can go right into the power plant (at least, I did) and say, that sure is a big stack. Anyone who likes big things should visit the quiet and strange town of Homer City.  read more...
Gettysburg Museum of History  ::   ::  Created on Sunday, November 19, 2017
Offbeat and Eclectic Gettysburg Museum of History.

Fly into W05 and take the free shuttle or cab or ride from the airport - this is about 2.3 miles away.

219 Baltimore St, Gettysburg, PA 17325

While there, make a day or weekend of it as there is PLENTY to see, do and eat!

Mike Marra, Keystone Flight

Background:

It's called the Gettysburg Museum of History, but that doesn't mean it offers only rusty guns and Civil War bullets.

Erik Dorr holds a scrap of Hitler's Suicide Couch. Stain at the bottom is Hitler's blood.

"Some people ask, 'Why do you have all this Nazi stuff? What the hell's JFK's boxer shorts doing in here?' said museum owner and curator Erik Dorr. "They just don't get it."

Erik started collecting when he was nine. He eventually became a professional antiquities dealer and opened his museum in 2008. Its 4,000 artifacts -- just a fraction of Erik's collection -- span U.S. and world history, and fills the first floor of his Gettysburg townhouse. The museum is free to the public because Erik wants to share his collection with as many people as possible, even if some of them don't understand why it's in Gettysburg.

Marilyn's bra is displayed in the Kennedy room near JFK's boxer shorts.

Take, for example, Erik's x-ray of Hitler's head. "The U.S. Army got it from his dentist," Erik said. "They made a file of his medical records, just trying to figure out what was wrong with Hitler." The x-ray is displayed next to Eva Braun's hand-embroidered lingerie and a fabric scrap from the couch where Der Fuehrer killed himself, stained with Hitler's blood. "We paid a fortune for that," Erik said. "But I told myself, 'You know what? I'm not gonna find another one.'"

World War I trophy skull. Photo next to it shows the British soldiers who acquired the keepsake.
Two questions naturally come to mind. Are these things fake? And if they aren't, why aren't they in some mega-official museum in Washington, DC?

Erik, a stickler for documentation, said that everything in his museum is real, although visitors sometimes insist that Hitler didn't commit suicide and escaped to Argentina. As for why it's all here, Erik had a practical explanation. "It can't all be in the National Archives or the Smithsonian," he said. "And unless it's really earth-shattering, it's just gonna get filed away. People who have amazing things come to us because they know those things will be displayed."

From Baghdad to Hiroshima, a snapshot of catastrophic human history.

Erik took me on a whirlwind tour of the rooms in his museum: we saw trophy skulls from World Wars I and II; Jennie Wade's love letters; a piece of George Washington's coffin; slivers of the crucifixion cross of Jesus; President Grant's cigar; Saddam Hussein's dinnerware. For Gettysburg purists, Erik has an extensive collection of battlefield relics. "Here's a rifle that blew up in a guy's face; here's a bullet that shot off a solider's arm; here are some bones with bullets in them," Erik said. "We have wood with bullets, too, but those aren't as cool."

For us, Erik's collecting skills shine brightest in his John F. Kennedy room, where visitors can see JFK's unexpected boxer shorts near Marilyn Monroe's bra and a hand-written prescription for one of the drugs that killed her. Erik showed us one of Kennedy's well-used rocking chairs, a piece of bloody leather from his assassination limousine, and a packet of dirt saved by Kennedy's gravedigger. One of the boxes that Lee Harvey Oswald stacked at the School Book Depository is displayed with the fire sprinkler that was over his head when he shot the President.

Visitors to the museum are often surprised by what they find within.

Erik also has the spent shell from the bullet that killed Oswald. "That's the shot," Erik said, still awed by his proximity to history. "It should be in the Dallas Police archives, but they gave it away!"

The Gettysburg Museum of History is filled with surprising things you never knew existed and never imagined you'd see in public. Erik said that he hopes to move his collection into a more modern museum space some day, but we secretly hope that he doesn't; it's far more satisfying where it is, like an overstuffed attic or closet, rewarding visitors with weird treasures everywhere they look.

"We're trying to break out into the real world," Erik told me, "but I guess maybe we never will. We are the punk rock of history museums."

Nothing wrong with that.  read more...
Red Baron Airport Diner  ::   ::  Created on Saturday, November 18, 2017
The diner at Southbridge Airport has once again re-opened and will be open all winter too !
The hours are Tuesday thru Sunday, 7:00 - 2:00 but they are open Thursday and Friday until 8:00pm for dinner.
Diner type service like it use to be,
Friday's seafood is excellent !!

Also, There is self serve fuel available as 3B0.

  read more...
Fox's Pizza Den of Indiana, PA  ::   ::  Created on Sunday, September 10, 2017
Fox's Pizza Den of Indiana, PA near Jimmy Stewart Airport, Indiana, PA
580 Philadelphia St.
Indiana, PA 15701

Land at the magnificent Jimmy Stewart Airport and borrow the courtesy car to downtown, where there is a nice array of shops, places to eat and interesting stores! 10 min drive.

This is really GOOD pizza and they have great service and discounts for various groups, like our police officers, firemen, military, etc. - just ask for it.

When we went the owner was there and gave us the royal treatment! He probably does this for everyone! Overall superb experience flying in to eat here!

Mike Marra, Keystone Flight

Background from the owners:

Fox’s Pizza Den, family owned and operated for over 44 years, serves the very best authentic pizzas, strombolis, salads, nearly world famous “wedgies”, gourmet pizzas and specialty hoagies.

Feast with us today. All of our meals are handmade with the finest ingredients and baked to perfection. You’ll love our hand tossed dough and our award winning pizza sauce, our San Marzano style grown tomatoes are plucked off the vine only at their juicy, ripened peak & fresh packed with unique Italian Pecorino Romano cheese from the rugged Apennine mountains of Central Italy, freshly grated and blended with a special grade of Italian Extra Virgin Olive Oil, all complimented with freshly squeezed garlic and a special Italian spice blend. Our pizzas are topped with our special blend of 100% real cheeses, and then layered with the freshest selection of your favorite meats & vegetables.

Whether it’s a bambino or the BIG DADDY we have a size for every appetite. Treat your family to the tastiest pizza in town. Call a location near YOU right now and let Fox’s serve you “From Our Den To Your Den”.

On March 7, 1971, with $500, a rented storeroom and a few pieces of used equipment rescued from the snow and ice of a Pittsburgh scrap yard, Jim Fox fulfilled his lifelong dream of opening a pizza shop in his hometown of Pitcairn, Pennsylvania. As the first pizza slid from the oven at 4:00 that afternoon, he had no way of knowing that he’d be sold out just six hours later, making Fox’s Pizza Den an instant success.

In 1973, Jim opened a second Fox’s Pizza Den in nearby Harrison City and a third in East Pittsburgh. With the opening of his fourth location in Swissvale, Jim introduced an innovative concept that would revolutionize the pizza industry in the Pittsburgh area — home delivery. As word spread, friends began calling Jim about opening franchised pizza shops. Realizing that franchising could help others reach their dreams of independence, Jim incorporated Fox’s Pizza Den in 1974.
Now celebrating our 45th anniversary, we see it hasn’t stopped growing. Today there are more than 200 franchises operating coast to coast in 25 states. Fox’s Pizza Distribution, formed in 1986, provides the franchises with consistent high-quality product and reliable distribution. Because of its successful formula, Fox’s Pizza Den was voted best pizza franchise of 1993 by the National Pizza and Pasta Association and received PMQ’s 2005 and 2007 Pizza Industry Enterprise (PIE) award. Fox’s has been consistently ranked as one of the best pizza and sandwich franchises in the United States by Entrepreneur and Pizza Today magazines.

In making Fox’s Pizza Den a success, Jim Fox has been able to provide entrepreneurs with the opportunity to achieve their own success and independence while strengthening the economies of small, all-American towns.  read more...
Best Way Pizza of Indiana, PA  ::   ::  Created on Sunday, September 10, 2017
BEST WAY PIZZA of Indiana, Pennsylvania (Jimmy Stewart Airport)

Home of the Square Cut
Serving great food to great people for nearly 60 years!

Land at KIDI, Indiana County, PA Jimmy Stewart Airport and take the courtesy car into town - about 10 minutes and park out front. This is "pizza in a hurry" if you don't have a lot of time and need to eat and look around real fast! Still, pretty good for the price and location!

Mike Marra, Keystone Flight

Background from the owners:

HOW IT ALL BEGAN
The story of our famous square cut pizza begins in the early 1950s in an unlikely place, The Pennsylvania Railroad. Railroad worker, Gene Caparella, dusted off his grandmother’s pizza recipe one day and started bringing it to work. His fellow railroad workers tried it and loved it, and so the foundations of a pizza business started to form. In 1955, Gene was laid off from the railway and seized the opportunity to open his very first shop, which he named Best Way Pizza. Gene continued to operate his pizza shop in various locations around Altoona for 25 years, until his retirement in 1980.

Unhappy with the thought of never having Best Way Pizza again, Mr. Caparella’s friend, long-time customer, and square cut pizza fanatic, Craig LeCrone Sr. purchased the Best Way Pizza business and reopened a store in Hollidaysburg, PA. Craig Sr. kept his job at UPS until 1982, when he decided he liked being square and wanted to open up several more locations throughout the area.

OUR ORIGINAL, JUST FASTER.
Not content with simply offering square cuts for eat-in or takeout, LeCrone Sr. installed, what is now our iconic feature: the Best Way Drive Thru! Now Best Way Pizza customers can cruise on through and get the fastest, tastiest pizza in no time flat. The first location to gain the drive thru was the 6th Ave Altoona shop in 1986.

ONWARD & UPWARD
Keeping it all in the family, Mr. LeCrone’s son, Craig LeCrone Jr. joined the Best Way Pizza team in 1988 and together they’ve worked to build the Best Way Pizza business. With a passion for providing cheesy, square cuts of pizza fast and at affordable prices, the Best Way Pizza brand quickly achieved a mass following and the LeCrone family sold its first franchise in 1991 in Greenwood, Pennsylvania.

That store is still cranking out cheesy square cut goodness to this day. Since then, numerous franchise locations have opened throughout Pennsylvania, and we hope to add many more. Right now, there are 11 franchise locations and 1 company owned location, so you’re never far from a bite to eat at Best Way.

EXPANDED LOCATIONS & EXPANDED MENUS
In addition to our traditional and now famous Best Way square cuts, we pride ourselves on offering you the very best pizza, salads, subs and squarebolis. So stop by a location near you, and drive-thru, eat-in, or carry-out and make Best Way Pizza your neighborhood pizza shop.
 
Contact Us Today!
Please email all inquiries to bestwaypizza@bestwaypizza.com  read more...
9th Street Deli of Indiana, PA  ::   ::  Created on Sunday, September 10, 2017
9th Street Deli of Indiana, PA
901 Philadelphia St
Indiana, PA 15701

Land at wonderful Jimmy Stewart Indiana County Airport and take the courtesy car into town for a great sub or sandwich - this is RIGHT NEXT to the famous Jimmy Stewart Museum (see other post on that location).

Great food and prices here - and the quality of ingredients is very telling and tasty!

I fly with my dog, so this was a great place in that they have outdoor seating on "VFR Days" and he really enjoyed the roast beef sandwich as well - see photo.

Park right out in front or back - we had no problem finding a spot for the courtesy car/truck. Recommended when visiting KIDI - Indiana, PA!

Mike Marra, Keystone Flight
  read more...
Carson's Creekside Restaurant & Lounge (KMTN)  ::   ::  Created on Friday, September 8, 2017
Carson's Creekside Restaurant & Lounge (KMTN)
1110 Beech Dr, Middle River, MD 21220

Land at Martin State Airport and this is a 11 minute nice walk along the water to the restaurant!

Great airport and FBO - they will give you a ride if you need it in their van.

Note there is a $21 daily ramp/parking/FBO fee here - a bit steep, but this restaurant and the Glenn Martin Aviation Museum is well worth the day trip!

We ordered the CRAB CAKE SANDWICH and it was the LARGEST we had ever seen! This was a magnificent sandwich - perhaps the BEST crab cake I have ever had, and I spend a lot of time landing at airports along and in the Chesapeake Bay looking for the world's best crab cakes! It was that good.

If you go on a nice day, please request the BACK PORCH to sit on - it is a beautiful area that overlooks the docks and river and there is plenty of wildlife to see from your seats - ducks, other birds, fish jumping and scenic vistas!

Getting into KMTN looks complicated on the sectionals but is actually very easy. It is under the Class B and inside a Class D near some restricted airspace to the east and the SFRA to the west, but do not let that worry you! We flew the instrument approach to 31 (The LDA 31) and had approach and tower helping us the entire time.

The walk from the FBO to the museum is 6 minutes - easy!

Hope you visit this great place!

Mike Marra, Keystone Flight

From the owners we met:

If you love great American Fare including fantastic steak, seafood, etc. AND comfortable dining, contact us or come see us today at Carson's Creekside Restaurant and Lounge.  Our menu offers a mouthwatering assortment of classic steak and seafood in a warm, relaxing nautical atmosphere, serving folks fresh, inshore and offshore specialties for lunch and dinner. No matter when your hunger catches up with you, we have just what ou're craving, all accented with original recipe seasonings and served up fresh to satisfy you at any time of day.
At Carson's Creekside Restaurant and Lounge----
You'll come for the Food and Stay for the Fun!!
See you soon, See you Creekside !!   
 Gary & Debbie  read more...
Glenn L. Martin Maryland Aviation Museum (KMTN)  ::   ::  Created on Friday, September 8, 2017
Glenn L. Martin Maryland Aviation Museum (KMTN) Located ON the airport. This is a Class D airport that is below the Class B airspace of Baltimore, MD and is flanked by Restricted Airspace to the south and east. Easy to get into as long as you plan it and talk to approach and tower - we flew the LDA 31 instrument approach in and had no problems - controllers were very helpful. The airport has a daily ramp fee of $21 at the time of this post, 8 Sep 2017. While that is steep, the visit to the airport, Glenn Martin Museum and a local seafood restaurant was WELL worth it! Both this museum and the restaurant are within easy walking distance on the airport and off. Note - the museum is not co-located with the aircraft static displays and you will need a ride from the museum to get to them as they are in a restricted area on the field, which is host to USAF A-10 Thunderbolt ground attack planes and the MD Police. This museum is WORTH A DAY TRIP! Founded in 1990, The Glenn L. Martin Maryland Aviation Museum is a private, all-volunteer, non-profit, tax exempt Internal Revenue Code 501(c)(3) corporation. The Museum's purpose is to maintain an educational institution dedicated to the promotion, preservation, and documentation of aviation and space history in Maryland, namely, the contributions of Glenn L. Martin and his successful company.Operated by dedicated volunteers, the Museum is active in the cultural life of surrounding communities and has begun to extend its activities state-wide. The Museum is certified by the U.S. Navy and Army. All funds required for the acquisition, restoration, maintenance, and display of museum material are derived from individual and corporate donations. Members of the Museum share a desire to preserve aviation history and we welcome all those who share the same. Maryland has a rich aviation and space heritage.The Museum has collected over a dozen aircraft, thousands of reels of motion picture films, plans, documents, research models, aircraft tools, and components; and a gigantic indexed collection of more than 200,000 aviation and company photographs. These archives have supported documentary films and numerous publications. Without the efforts of the Museum, these research materials would not be available to the public; many of the collection's artifacts would have been destroyed.But much remains to be preserved and the collection is growing.  read more...
Shippensburg Airport now CLOSED!  ::   ::  Created on Monday, September 4, 2017
Shippensburg, PENN Airport is now CLOSED!

Owners sold it off to grow crops - looks like an ethanol farm (corn) and now the only airport in this town is GONE - very sad!

There were a number of places nearby where this airport provided access - now will be very difficult to get to by plane!

This area is losing airports every year - a very negative trend going on!

Sorry to report this one, folks - another airport gone for good!

Mike Marra, Keystone Flight  read more...
St. Mary's Airport Open House  ::   ::  Created on Friday, September 1, 2017
October 7, 2017 | 10am-4pm Join us at 2W6 for our fall Open House Don't miss this opportunity to see airplanes of all kinds, drone demonstrations, and classic cars on display. Featured in this event will be a DC-3, a Grumman Albatross and Art Nalls' Sea Harrier and L-39C Albatros This event is kid friendly, including balsa airplane races, face painting, and Reggie the Magician. Please call for information on transient parking for this event.   read more...
Velaro Station for Food (if everything else is closed) W29 Bay Bridge, MD  ::   ::  Created on Tuesday, August 22, 2017
Velaro Station for Food (if everything else is closed) W29 Bay Bridge, MD

Land at scenic Bay Bridge Airport and try the many GREAT places to eat right around the airport, but....if everything else is closed, VELARO across the street from the airport is always open!

Hot food, drinks and a place to stay if you are caught in bad weather - this is a way out!

Right across the street (on final) so very easy to find. Good, fast and cheap....a nice alternate if you need it for food, drinks or small items.

Mike Marra, Keystone Flight
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Cape Henelopen State Park Public Beach, DE  ::   ::  Created on Tuesday, August 22, 2017
Beaches and Open Spaces!

Land at KGED and rent a car for the day - this is well worth it!

Cape Henlopen's beaches attract thousands of visitors who enjoy ocean swimming and sunbathing. A designated swimming beach, accessible from the Lewes entrance to the park, provides lifeguard patrols between Memorial Day weekend and Labor Day (schedule mayvary due to staff availability).Umbrellas can be rented during the summer. The swimming area also features a modern bath house with showers, changing rooms, and a food concession. Mobi-Mat equipment, consisting of three 30-foot mats allowing those in wheelchairs and power chairs to access the beach from the boardwalk, is also available at this location.

The park's open spaces feature many other activities. A picnic pavilion and the "Officer's Club" building can both be reserved for group events. An 18-hole disc golf course encourages friendly competition, and basketball courts promote more active exercise. Winter hunting is permitted in some areas of the park; a hunting permit is required, and information can be obtained from the Park Office. Annual events such as the Kite Festival and the Halloween Fantasy Trail are family favorites. The park also conducts a variety of entertaining recreational programs, including natural history lectures, seaside seining, and birdwatching, to name but a few.

Cape Henlopen has many year-round hiking and biking opportunities. Experience the park's scenic and ever-changing landscape - and get a lesson in history - along the three-mile-long paved trail that loops the park. Take a trail break and climb to the top of the World War II Observation Tower, where the 360-degree views are spectacular. Or take a short climb to the top of a former military bunker to view the dynamic action along the Atlantic coastline. Explore the coastal environment along the Seaside or the Pinelands Nature Trails, or hike the six miles of beach along the Atlantic Ocean.

Surf Fishing Restrictions

This is one of the very FEW beaches you can drive on! Vehicles bearing surf-fishing permits (meaning their occupants must be actively engaged in recreational surf fishing) are required to park in single file, with a ban on vehicle stacking.

Fort Miles Museum and Historical Area Overview

Lying amidst rolling sand dunes, on a high bank overlooking the Atlantic Ocean, is the Fort Miles Historical Area, home of the Fort Miles Museum.  The central features of the museum include Battery 519, six barracks buildings, a fire control tower, an orientation building, and the Fort Miles Artillery Park. The museum tells the story of Fort Miles, a key piece of our nation's coastal defense, from World War II through the early 1970’s. 

The history of Fort Miles exemplifies America’s call to action to stem the tide of war against German invasions along the Atlantic Seaboard that, at the onset of World War II, appeared virtually unstoppable. The gun batteries of Fort Miles, secret state-of-the-art installations built within the massive sand dunes of Cape Henlopen, were designed to defend against the powerful German navy.

With more than 2,500 soldiers stationed on high alert, the heavy guns, mine fields and searchlights of Fort Miles defended the vital trade centers of Wilmington, Philadelphia, and beyond. As America moved into the cold war, the role of Fort Miles shifted to highly classified missions defending against the threat of Soviet submarine operations off our coastline.
Fort Miles is a special place for history enthusiasts, veterans, families, or anyone interested in learning about Delaware stories, Delaware heroes and Delaware’s role in WWII. Take a guided tour, enjoy an interpretive program, visit the art gallery, take in a special event, and celebrate the "greatest generation" in our nation's history.

The Fort Miles Museum
Museum exhibits and artifacts within Battery 519, a 15,000-square-foot fortified underground chamber, bring to life Delaware’s wartime stories of submarine encounters and surrender, daring actions of civilian pilots, and hometown heroes who sacrificed for our freedom. The Museum’s collection of armaments provides visitors a unique opportunity to experience first-hand how state-of-the-art technology from an earlier day was used to defend the homeland.
The grounds of the Museum  are open 8 a.m. to sunset daily. The Museum Orientation Building is open on Fridays and Saturdays from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. March 3 – June 10 and Tuesday through Saturday June 13 – September 9.

Mike Marra, Keystone Flight  read more...
Kent Island Golf Vacation Home near 3W3  ::   ::  Created on Tuesday, August 22, 2017
Kent Island Golf Vacation Home near 3W3

FIVE STARS! This review is for the Kent Island Golf House, rented by CAPT Bob and Donna. The Golf House is on 102 Queens Colony Drive, Kentmorr, a 14 minute walk from the 3W3 Airport and the beach. In a word, magnificent! We had a family of 6 stay at the Golf House for a 4-day weekend and loved it! Clean, spacious, and modern, this house had it all!

CAPT Bob also provided us a charter boat ride around the Bay and into Annapolis - really fun! The house is centrally located to many nice places, including the Delaware Beaches, the Kentmorr Restaurant, the Tiki Bar and beach, and the marina! Wonderful stay, thanks so much!

Mike and Brenda Marra, Keystone Flight of Carlisle, PA  read more...
Carini's Pizza near the Bay Bridge Airport, MD  ::   ::  Created on Tuesday, August 22, 2017
Carini's Pizza near the Bay Bridge Airport, Kent Island, Stevensville, MD - very easy walking distance from the FBO!

Enjoy fantastic pizza on Kent Island!

Land and be there in 5 minutes walking time! Walk out of the airport and simply make the first right turn (south) and walk for five minutes - it is right there!

Great slices, pies and Italian food - can't miss!

Enjoy Kent Island!

Mike Marra, Keystone Flight  read more...
Fort McHenry  ::   ::  Created on Tuesday, August 22, 2017
Home of the Star-Spangled-Banner! Fort McHenry, Baltimore, MD

Land at the very friendly Essex Airport and take a cab to the fort, or, to public transpo near the field to the fort area...worth the journey!

Fort McHenry, in Baltimore, Maryland, is a historical American coastal star-shaped fort best known for its role in the War of 1812, when it successfully defended Baltimore Harbor from an attack by the British navy from the Chesapeake Bay September 13–14, 1814. It was first built in 1798 and was used continuously by U.S. armed forces through World War I and by the Coast Guard in World War II. It was designated a national park in 1925, and in 1939 was redesignated a "National Monument and Historic Shrine".

During the War of 1812 a storm flag (17 by 25 feet (5.2 m × 7.6 m)) was flown over Fort McHenry during the bombardment. It was replaced early on the morning of September 14, 1814 with a larger garrison flag (30 by 42 feet (9.1 m × 12.8 m)).

The larger flag signaled American victory over the British in the Battle of Baltimore. The sight of the ensign inspired Francis Scott Key to write the poem "Defence of Fort M'Henry" that was later set to the tune "To Anacreon in Heaven" and become known as the "Star Spangled Banner", the national anthem of the United States.

This is a MUST SEE site for all Americans - very inspiring and uplifting! Highly recommended!

Mike Marra, Keystone Flight  read more...
Camp Miles Coastal Defense Fortress and Guns  ::   ::  Created on Tuesday, August 22, 2017
Fort Miles Museum and Historical Area

Land at Eagle Crest and take an inexpensive taxi to historic Camp Miles, DE

Lying amidst rolling sand dunes, on a high bank overlooking the Atlantic Ocean, is the Fort Miles Historical Area, home of the Fort Miles Museum.  The central features of the museum include Battery 519, six barracks buildings, a fire control tower, an orientation building, and the Fort Miles Artillery Park. The museum tells the story of Fort Miles, a key piece of our nation's coastal defense, from World War II through the early 1970’s. 

The history of Fort Miles exemplifies America’s call to action to stem the tide of war against German invasions along the Atlantic Seaboard that, at the onset of World War II, appeared virtually unstoppable. The gun batteries of Fort Miles, secret state-of-the-art installations built within the massive sand dunes of Cape Henlopen, were designed to defend against the powerful German navy.

With more than 2,500 soldiers stationed on high alert, the heavy guns, mine fields and searchlights of Fort Miles defended the vital trade centers of Wilmington, Philadelphia, and beyond. As America moved into the cold war, the role of Fort Miles shifted to highly classified missions defending against the threat of Soviet submarine operations off our coastline.

Fort Miles is a special place for history enthusiasts, veterans, families, or anyone interested in learning about Delaware stories, Delaware heroes and Delaware’s role in WWII. Take a guided tour, enjoy an interpretive program, visit the art gallery, take in a special event, and celebrate the "greatest generation" in our nation's history.

The Fort Miles Museum
Museum exhibits and artifacts within Battery 519, a 15,000-square-foot fortified underground chamber, bring to life Delaware’s wartime stories of submarine encounters and surrender, daring actions of civilian pilots, and hometown heroes who sacrificed for our freedom. The Museum’s collection of armaments provides visitors a unique opportunity to experience first-hand how state-of-the-art technology from an earlier day was used to defend the homeland.

The grounds of the Museum  are open 8 a.m. to sunset daily. The Museum Orientation Building is open on Fridays and Saturdays from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. March 3 – June 10 and Tuesday through Saturday June 13 – September 9.

Mike Marra, Keystone Flight  read more...

   
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